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The immune system consists of organs, cells, tissues, and proteins. Together, these carry out bodily processes that fight off pathogens, which are the viruses, bacteria, and foreign bodies that cause infection or disease.

When the immune system comes into contact with a pathogen, it triggers an immune response. The immune system releases antibodies, which attach to antigens on the pathogens and kill them.

There are plenty of supplements and products that claim to help improve immunity. But boosting your immune system is a bit harder to accomplish than you may think — and for good reason.

Your immune system is incredibly complex. From a cold to the flu to COVID-19, it has to be strong enough and sophisticated enough to fight off a variety of illnesses and infections, but not so strong that it overreacts unnecessarily — causing autoimmune disorders to develop. To operate in such a delicate balance, it’s tightly controlled by a variety of inputs.

Despite this complexity, there are things you can do to help give your immune system what it needs to ward off infection or illness. Here are ways to help following several analyses made by top online casinos experts.

Water 

Water is still the best thing you can drink. Each person varies, but aim to drink eight, 8-ounce glasses of water a day. That can be hard to do. Your body get dehydrated after hours of sleep, so drink a glass of water right away when you wake up. If you struggle with drinking enough water, set reminders throughout the day or drink a glass of water before each meal. Caffeine-free hot tea can count as part of your daily water tally.

Exercise regularly 

Exercise is essential to preventing chronic illnesses such as heart disease and high blood pressure, and to keep your weight in control. Exercise also contributes to a healthy immune system. It promotes good blood circulation, which helps your immune system do its job more efficiently.

Reduce stress  

Daily stress can overwork your immune system and drain your ability to stay healthy. Big and little daily stressors can constantly push your immune system. That’s why it’s important to take time for self-care. Make time each day to do things to “refill your tank.” Self-care varies from person to person. It can include setting aside time to read, meditate, talk a walk, do a hobby or get a massage. Playing games at machine a sous en ligne can also reduce a player’s stress in a short time.

Sleep 

Sleep is essential for the health of your body and brain. When you don’t get enough sleep your natural immune cells go down, and inflammation cells go up. Good sleep helps strengthen your immune system. Adults should try for at seven to eight hours of sleep a day. Children and teens need more sleep.

Eat right

As with most things in your body, a healthy diet is key to a strong immune system. This means making sure you eat plenty of vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats. In addition to providing your immune system the energy it needs, a healthy diet can help ensure you’re getting sufficient amounts of the micronutrients that play a role in maintaining your immune system, including:

Vitamin B6, found in chicken, salmon, tuna, bananas, green vegetables and potatoes (with the skin)

Vitamin C, found in citrus fruit, including oranges and strawberries, as well as tomatoes, broccoli and spinach

Vitamin E, found in almonds, sunflower and safflower oil, sunflower seeds, peanut butter and spinach

Since experts believe that your body absorbs vitamins more efficiently from dietary sources, rather than supplements, the best way to support your immune system is to eat a well-balanced diet.

Stay up-to-date on recommended vaccines 

Building a strong immune system starts with taking advantage of the best way we have to protect ourselves from harmful illnesses: vaccines. Your immune system is smart, but vaccines train it to be even smarter — helping it learn how to recognize and fight off certain disease-causing illnesses. It’s much safer for your immune system to learn via vaccination than through infection with these harmful germs.

Written by

Lisa Alther

Lisa Alther is a farmer of words in the field of creativity. She is an experienced independent content writer with a demonstrated history of working in the writing and editing industry. She is a multi-niche content chef who loves cooking new things.